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Classical Chinese Literature 中国古代文学: GEK1007 Reading List 古代中国的历史与文学参考书目

A guide to resources in Classical Chinese Literature.

GEK1007 Reading List 古代中国的历史与文学参考书目 (AY2016/2017, Semester 1)

请以IVLE里的“GEK1007 古代中国的历史与文学”课程大纲为准。
如是闭架书目(Closed-stack books),请网上预借。

有关此门课的RBR阅读书目,请浏览图书馆综合目录: LINC > RBR > Course Number > GEK1007

 

PART I – ANTIQUITY: FROM SHANG TO HAN
 
 
[1] 8/11         EARLIEST HISTORY AND LITERATURE: DIVINE ORACLES
Eno, Robert, “Deities and Ancestors in Early Oracle Inscriptions.” In Lopez (ed.), Religions of China in Practice (1996), pp. 41-51.
 
Suggestions for further reading:
Keightley, David, “The Religious Commitment: Shang Theology and the Genesis of Chinese Political Culture,” History of Religions 17, 3/4 (1978)
 
[2] 8/18         POEMS OF ANTIQUITY: CHU CI ON SOUL
Kroll, Paul (transl.), “An Early Poem of Mystical Excursion.” In Lopez (ed.), Religions of China in Practice (Princeton, 1996), pp. 156-62.
Owen, Stephen (transl.), “Calling Back the Soul.” In An Anthology of Chinese Literature (Norton, 1996), pp. 204-211.
Yü Ying-shih, “‘O Soul, Come Back!’ A Study in the Changing Conceptions of the Soul and Afterlife in Pre-Buddhist China.” Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies 47 (Dec. 1987) 2, pp. 363-395.
 
Suggestions for further reading:
Hawkes, David, The Songs of the South: An Anthology of Ancient Chinese Poems by Qu Yuan and Other Poets (Penguin, 1985), pp. 15-66 (“General Introduction”)
 
 [3] 8/25        CONFUCIAN DIALOGUES: KONG ZI ON RITES
Lau, D.C. (transl.), Analects (Lunyu), pp. 63-75
Csikszentmihalyi, Mark, Chapter on “Confucianism.” In J. Neusner (ed.), Introduction to World Religions: Communities and Cultures (Abingdon Press, 2010), pp. 250-65.
 
Suggestions for further reading:
Riegel, Jeffrey, “Confucius.” Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Online resource: http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/confucius/
 
[4] 9/1           POETIC APHORISMS: COSMOLOGY
Lau, D.C. (transl.), Dao De Jing, I-VII (p. 57-63), X- XIII (p. 66-69), XVIII-XXII (p. 74-79), XXXV (p. 94), XLII (p. 103), XLIX (p. 110).
Komjathy, Louis, “The Daoist Tradition in China.” In Nadeau (ed.), The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Chinese Religions (2012), pp. 171 – 196. Library E-Resource.
 
Suggestions for further reading:
Chan, Alan, “Laozi.” Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Online resource:
http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/laozi/
 
[5] 9/8           DAOIST DIALOGUES: BEYOND CATEGORIES
Mair, Victor (transl.), Wandering on the Way [Zhuang Zi]: “The Gourd and the Tree” (p. 7-9), “Other and I” (13-14), “The Butterfly” (24), “A Cook” (26), “Sir Sacrifice” (57-59), “Joy of Fishes” (165), “Woodworker Ch’ing” (182-83).
Eno, Robert, “Cook Ding’s Dao and the Limits of Philosophy.” In Kjellberg and Ivanhoe (eds.), Essays on Skepticism, Relativism, and Ethics in the Zhuangzi (1996), pp. 127-51.
 
Suggestions for further reading:
Kaltenmark, Max, “Chuang Tzu.” In Lao Tzu and Taoism (1969), pp. 70-109
 
PART II – MEDIEVAL PERIOD: FROM HAN TO TANG
 
[6] 9/15         LITERATURE, HISTORY, HERITAGE?
Nienhauser, William (transl.), Records of the Grand Scribe [Selected passages from Wu Di Zhuan]
Csikszentmihalyi, Mark (transl.), Readings in Han Chinese Thought. Cambridge and Indianapolis: Hackett, 2006. Selected passages from biographies.
 
Suggestions for further reading:
Nienhauser, “Sima Qian and the Shiji.” In The Oxford History of Historical Writing (Oxford, 2011), pp. 463-83.
Cohen, Alvin, “Avenging Ghosts and Moral Judgement in Ancient Chinese Historiography: Three Examples from Shih-Chi.” In Legend, Lore, and Religion in China, pp. 97-109
 
[7] 9/29         BUDDHIST POLEMICS: COSMOS AND SPIRITS
Gregory, Peter N., “A Window on Chinese Buddhist Thought.” In Inquiry into the Origin of Humanity: An Annotated Translation of Tsung-mi’s Yüan jen lun with a Modern Commentary (Hawai’i, 1995), pp. 3-24; “Part 1, Exposing Deluded Attachments: Confucianism and Taoism,” pp. 80-104
 
Suggestions for further reading:
Poceski, Mario, “Spread and Flourishing of Buddhism in China.” Introducing Chinese Religions (2009), pp. 112-135.
 
[8] 10/6         MIRACLE TALES: BUDDHISM AND THE BODY
Kieschnick, John, “Asceticism.” In The Eminent Monk (1997), pp. 16-66.
Campany (transl.), “The Earliest Tales of the Bodhisattva Guanshiyin,” In Lopez (ed.), Religions of China in Practice, pp. 82-95.
Campany, Robert (transl.), Signs from the Unseen Realm (2012), pp. 63-77.
 
Suggestions for further reading:
LaFleur, William, “Body.” In Taylor (ed.), Critical Terms for Religious Studies (1998), pp. 36-53.
 
PART III – THE LATE EMPIRE: FROM SONG TO QING
 
[9] 10/13       HAGIOGRAPHIES: BUDDHISM AND LOCAL RELIGION
Idema, Wilt (transl.), “The Precious Scroll of Incense Mountain,” Part I, pp. 45-97; Part II, pp. 99-159. In Personal Salvation and Filial Piety (2008).
Meulenbeld, Mark, “Death and Demonization of a Bodhisattva: Avalokitesvara’s Reformulation within Chinese Theology,” pp. 1-40
 
 
[10] 10/20    VERNACULAR NOVELS: LITERATURE AND LOCAL TRADITIONS
Owen, Stephen (transl.), “From The Romance of the Gods (Feng-shen yan-yi): Ne-zha and His Father,” in Owen. (ed., trans.), An Anthology of Chinese Literature: Beginnings to 1911 (New York: Norton, 1996), p. 771-806.
 “From the Enfeoffment of the Gods: Ne-zha and his Father”
Meulenbeld, Mark, Demonic Warfare: Daoism, Territorial Networks, and the History of a Ming Novel (2015), chapter 5.
 
Suggestions for further reading:
Sutton, Donald, “Transmission in Popular Religion: The Jiajiang Festival Troupe of Southern Taiwan,” in Unruly Gods, 212-249
 
[11] 10/27    THEATRE: PERFORMANCES OF THE DEAD
Birch, Cyril (transl.), The Peony Pavilion: Mudan ting. Sections: [“Infernal Judgment,” “Spirit Roaming,” “A Union in the Shades”]
de Groot, J.J.M., The Religious System of China, Section on Funerary Practices
 
Suggestions for further reading:
Zeitlin, Judith, The Phantom Heroine: Ghosts and Gender in Seventeenth Century Chinese Literature (2007). Introduction and Chapter 1.
 
[12] 11/3       VERNACULAR NOVELS (II): LITERATURE AND SPIRIT POSSESSION
Romance of the Three Kingdoms (Sanguo Yanyi), Chapter 1 and other selected passages.
Cohen, Paul, History in Three Keys (1997), chapter 3, “Mass Spirit Possession,” pp. 96-118.
 
Suggestions for further reading:
Cohen, Paul, History in Three Keys (1997), chapter 2, “Drought and the foreign presence,” pp. 69-95; chapter 4, “Magic and Female Pollution,” pp. 119-45.

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